Linen Closet Shelving

The days of forgetting a towel and running naked through the upstairs to the hall closet are officially OVER! We DIYed closet shelves!

When we redid our master bath, we removed a huge jacuzzi tub to make room for a custom shower and a linen closet, something our bathroom was lacking. After the bathroom was finished we never got around to actually putting shelves in the closet. For a while the vacuum and a step ladder lived in there.

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Thats me! I need a hair cut, so I’ve been told. I’m 5’9″. So this is a really large closet. Can you see the excitement on my face about getting some shelves in here? WOO.

We opted not to use wire shelving because I kinda have OCD. It drives me BONKERS when things don’t stand up straight because they’re an awkward width. For example, a shampoo bottle might lean to the right a little bit because it’s between the wires. I can’t live my life like that. I struggle with this shelving crisis in our laundry room. Honestly, it makes me dizzy. So we went with wood!

This DIY involved some power tools. So make sure you’re prepared if you’re opting for wood like we did!

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Obviously we’re Ryobi fans. The batteries are awesome. They last a really long time and they charge quickly. On the left is the cordless circular saw, on the right is some kind of super drill. It’s awesome. Shortly after we bought our house we invested in the Ultimate Ryobi Combo Kit. It was a little pricy, but it was completely worth it. We’ve used every tool in the kit and the bag is perfect to keep tools securely stored. Now we have no excuse to lose any tools!

The Home Depot rocks. If you don’t have one near you, I apologize. Home Depot is usually our first stop for every DIY. Our “wood” shelving is actually MDF particle board. It’s really light weight and ridiculously easy to work with. The entire piece of particle board was $26 and they cut it to the size we specified right in the store so we were able to fit it in the car with ease.

 

We also picked up framing wood (actual wood) and made rails to hold the shelving in place.

When we got home I was so excited to start hammering and cutting and screwing stuff in place that I completely forgot that I needed to paint the wood. This DIY was super cheap, but it took us two weeks to execute because we needed to wait 24 hours for the paint to dry and multiple coats to cover the wood… and I’m too lazy to DIY when I get home from work, so we wait for the weekends. However, it only took around 4 working hours to paint (minus dry time) and hang the rails.

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I used Behr Ultra White to paint the MDF board and the wood rails. Our basement is gross… don’t look at this picture too hard. You will start to feel the cobwebs.

 

That’s my hot design assistant. Full disclosure: For this project though he was the boss and I was the assistant. He’s measuring the bottom shelf, cutting the wood rail to size and screwing it into the wall. If you can’t find studs in the wall, make sure you’re using anchors. The shelves will be too heavy once you put stuff on them to stay in place unsupported. Also, it’s easier to start from the bottom and work your way up. Maybe it’s not, but that’s what we did.

 

After we got in the first rails we tested placing the shelf on top. It fit really well, but we added a second piece just to make sure that the shelf wouldn’t accidentally drop. We repeated the process 4 more times. We opted to do a half shelf on top because we wouldn’t really be able to reach back on a shelf that’s 6 ft.

Here’s the final result! No more naked sprints and flinging water all over the upstairs! WOO!

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Industrial Shelving

I feel like we live at Home Depot. Our relationship with Home Depot is similar to most people’s relationship with Target. You come for one thing and you end up leaving with 100. The guy at the paint counter and I are on a first name basis. He’s the man. So last weekend, during our 9th trip to Home Depot of the week, we were looking for some wood to build shelving in our Master Bath and we saw these industrial pipe kits on sale. So immediately the wheels in my little DIY mind start turning. Brian was intrigued and then all of a sudden it was like he knew. He knew we came to do one shelving project and were going to leave with two. So here’s what this corner of our bathroom looked like to start with:

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The tile on the wall is NY SoHo tile from a whole sale tile place a few miles from our home. The Master Bath is by far my favorite room in the house and the largest transformation so far. I’m actually really surprised that its taken me this long to decorate.

Here’s the packaging and how the mount was organized. Everything we needed to hang the flange was included right inside this package. Stuff like this makes my heart dance. There’s no need to run around and figure out what kind of anchor you need or if you have the correct kind of screw.

I used the Ryobi Compact Laser Level to hang the mounts. This gadget is seriously worth every penny. I use it to hang stuff all the time!

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So once I got the level set, I took the wall flange and drew circles in the holes so I would know where to drill.

Buying wood at Home Depot is super easy! They even cut it for you, if you don’t have a table saw at home you don’t have to worry about fitting it in your car. Originally Home Depot cut the wood, but we needed to take a little more off when we saw how oversized it looked on the wall. I stained it using Minwax Honey and let it dry overnight.

Here’s the styled final product! I made the sign with a scrap piece of wood I had!

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Book Shelf Up-Cycle

 

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This bookshelf was one of my favorite and quickest up-cycles to date! I was so excited to start working on it that I almost completely forgot to take the “before” picture. I bought this sad little bookshelf from an online yard sale. It was in terrible condition and desperately needed some life breathed back into it. Something about it was crying to be bright and boisterous. So I went with a green that made me feel happy.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • sander
  • paint
  • fabric of your choice, or a second paint color
  • Mod Podge
  • furniture wax

First, sand down the wood completely. It needs to be a smooth surface. If there are multiple layers of paint already on there, try to get as much off as you can.

Second, wipe down the surface so that all dirt (which there was a TON of), dust, or grime is removed.

Third, you’re ready to paint! I did three coats because I loved this color so much. Each time it got a new coat, the color became more vibrant. Don’t be shy with paint coats!

After I painted the entire piece and I let it dry for 24 hours, I measured the areas I wanted the fabric to fill. It’s better to have a little extra than to cut your fabric too short and have gaps to work around. Just like the coffee table up-cycle, the Mod Podge technique is the same.

Put down a thick layer of Mod Podge over the area the fabric will be placed. You’ll need to work quickly, this dries fast! Place the fabric over the layer of Mod Podge. Be sure to pull the fabric tight and push out any wrinkles. Once you’re satisfied with the way its positioned, add two more layers of Mod Podge on top of the fabric to seal it in. If the fabric hangs over anywhere, a box cutter can be used to cut away the excess.

I repeated this process 3 times to give the shelf a fun background.

When that’s completely dry, take an old rag (that will not fray) and go over the entire wood area with the finishing wax.

Here was my finished product:

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